MAP

Friday, January 2, 2015

water fuel circuit s1r9a9m9


I found a good place for eveyone to get HV diodes at high amps, inside old microwave ovens. They range from about 10kV -15KV at about 1/2 an amp each! Also if you don't have a few microwaves lying around contact your local microwave/TV repairs shop and order some spares. As far as tubes are concerned Im no help there, but I do think that Tesla used tubes his high voltage setups Thanks for all the feedback on the diodes! The ones I got from Peter are HV03-12....350ma/12kv microwave oven diodes. I found there are hv03-15's that are a little more beefier with higher reverse ratings. I see data sheets from them and a bunch of sites requiring signup just to get quotes but no outright retail prices. If going the high amp low volt route like S1R - then the 600v 60amp diodes are probably more easy to come by....and if going high voltage/low capacity route like Peter and I tried, need an ideal solution for diodes. I want to try inverter direct like Luc's diagram and make a real comparison. Is there a complete diagram of S1R's method so far incorporating his relay/inverter/plug/coil and the 3 wire coil? The hv/low capacity route we tried is definitely proven to the point of dead diodes and the effect kept climbing to that point. If the secondary power input is about joules...the higher the better...Tesla would have preferred high voltage low capacity quick abrupt discharges instead of the inverter direct method. I'll use whatever works and I'm sure anybody else would too. On S1R's relay diagram...is he showing that he is actually making connections to the cores of the relay coils? coils and transformers of many different types, but wondered from the getgo how S1r's unit could really work. There have been so many questions in my mind, and from others, about the S1r "transformer," and what that really did (if anything) in the circuit used by S1r to run his 18hp B&S generator engine on water, that I decided to go back to his Video#1, and make as thorough an analysis of the hookups as was possible, and I did learn a lot from doing that. The video moves around quite a bit, so is in and out of focus often, but there are frames I found that briefly do show the actual connections (external to the tin container that the "transformer was inside of). I just kept clicking the play/pause button to advance very slowly and find what I was looking for. Here's what I found: 1.) The spark plug has a brown wire connected to its base. 2.) The spark plug tip has two wires - a large white wire (perhaps 10 gauge) that leads to the tin "transformer" enclosure, and would be connected inside to the bare copper lead output from the 5 turn coil. The other wire at the tip is a black wire of similar size, but heads off in the direction of the battery. It would not be connected to the negative terminal of the battery, of course, as the jumper cable from the battery shows that the battery negative is grounded to the engine block, while the jumper cable positive clamp is used by the assistant to complete the positive connection at the starter. With the black wire running off the plug tip, down to the ground, and through the grass, it is impossible to see where the other end actually terminates. It is only logical, though, to assume that it is attached to a positive, low voltage, high amperage source. 3.) The high voltage (HV) output from the ignition coil goes into the tin enclosure, and would of course be connected to the input lead of the 5 turn coil. Okay, so let's say we can assume the 5 turn coil is definitely connected, and the HV passes through it and on to the spark plug tip. Now what about the other connections inside the tin? 4.) There are only three wires coming out of the tin: the large HV spark wire from the ignition coil, the white wire connected to the plug tip, and a brown wire. Hmmm, There should be 4 wires, according to Sir's hookup diagram, from his photo of the transformer: S1r step up transformer coil close-up.jpg - Windows Live SkyDrive So the hookup inside the tin container cannot be as S1r suggests. He suggests that one lead should come out of the tin and go to the battery positive terminal, while the 4th lead goes to engine ground through a constant current usage device such as a 60 watt lamp. 5.) Here's where it gets interesting. The brown wire, running out of the tin enclosure, appears at first glance to be the same wire connected to the base of the spark plug, and that would seem correct according to S1r's photo, minus a 60 watt lamp of course. So what is the purpose of the brown wire? 6.) Upon close examination, I was able to see that the brown wire does not run directly from the tin container to the spark plug base. While they are the same size and brown color, they are actually two separate wires which are divided off from a two-conductor cord. That can clearly be seen if you stop Video #1 at 0:50 on the timer. That cord runs over to the inverter, and is plugged into the inverter's 110V AC outlet. Okay, so one AC lead from the inverter goes to the plug base, and the other goes into the tin container, to an unknown connection point. 7.) Now what about the inverter? It appears that S1r intended to use it for the setup, but he later said that it wasn't actually connected. And if you follow the inverter-to-battery cables over to the battery, you see that the cable clamps are both lying on the ground there, at 1:08 and 1:09 elapsed time in the video. So, no AC current was sent through the brown wires. The only connection, provided at the inverter's AC plug, would be to the secondary coil winding inside the inverter. That winding, and the long length of the dual conductor brown cord, would only add resistance between the spark plug base, and whatever the brown lead is connected to inside the tin. So if the inverter isn't doing anything, and the 2nd and third coil windings of S1r's "transformer" are not completing a circuit, then where does the low voltage, high current enhancement come from? 8.) The low V, high A current actually comes from a battery charger hooked up to the old, yellow battery. The charger is connected, and you can hear the buzz from it being turned on at 1:32 of the video. The charger is an older Schauer model which has two output rates - one for charging at 10 amps, and another for starting an engine at 50 amps. You can't see the charger at the time he switches it on, so the actual amp rate he used is unknown, but is either 10 or 50 amps. It is interesting to note that Gotoluc says you should have 10 amps or more when using his bridge rectifier circuit for a DC low voltage, high current enhancement, and Capacitor 70 actually uses a 50 amp rectifier. Perhaps S1r was operating the charger at 50 amps, and this would explain why the yellow battery was damaged, and needed to be replaced by a new battery for the second video, since S1r was not using any protective device that could have prevented the battery damage. How, might you ask, was the LV, high current source added in to the spark circuit? As we know from watching Video #1, the charger is connected to the battery, and there is a negative jumper cable leading to a ground on the engine block. This effectively introduces the negative of the charger's LV, high amp circuit to the base of the spark plug, which is also ground connected. The positive connection, at the tip of the spark plug, comes through the black wire that was mentioned in #2. 9.) So you do have a constant current, LV, high amp potential applied to the spark plug, only not in the method suggested by S1r in his explanation of the "transformer" outputs. And when the HV pulse from the ignition coil passes through the 5 turn coil of the "transformer," and jumps the gap of the spark plug, the LV, High current from the charger follows it and enhances the spark. So then, what does the "transformer" actually do, if anything at all? 10.) If hooked up as S1r suggests, and if made as S1r made it, perhaps about 5 amps would be going through the "second coil" and "third coil" when initially activated, which really isn't enough draw according to Gotoluc or Capacitor70 to achieve the desired effect. Also, the wire heats up and causes greater resistance in the windings, and would get very hot - eventually burning off the insulation. So anyone experimenting with the nail core "transformer" would not realize the result they had hoped for. It did play a part in S1r's successful running of the engine, though, and here's what that part is: 11.) The long length of the "transformer's" bare copper wire, which is connected to the ignition coil and the spark plug tip, really has only one functional purpose. It is coiled, and it's leads bent back, to cause resistance that slows the passage of electrons, thus effectively retarding the spark timing somewhat, and this is a desired effect for a water explosion in the cylinder of an engine. So what about the other coils of the "transformer?" 12.) Coils of the "transformer's" 7-turn and 13 turn windings did absolutely nothing when used in S1r's video, because they were not connected to a completed circuit. You see that I have used quotation marks whenever mentioning the "transformer," and that is because it really is not acting as a transformer at all, let alone the "step-up-transformer" that S1r suggests. The bottom line here is that S1r was able to run his B&S generator engine on water for the You Tube videos by producing a plasma spark comprised of low amperage, high voltage pulses coming from the ignition coil, combined with low voltage, high amperage (10 to 50 amps) as provided by the battery charger, which gives a constant current path. In reality, the working Capacitor 70 motorbike circuit, using water as fuel, is nearly identical to what S1r was doing with the B&S engine. See Capacitor70 working motorbike circuit.jpg - Windows Live SkyDrive Capacitor70 used the same technique as S1r, applying 50 amps of low voltage current across the spark plug, which followed the high voltage arc across the spark gap. The only real difference is that Cap70 used diodes to prevent the high and low voltage currents from wandering to any place in the circuit other than the spark plug tip. So Capacitor70's successful bench tests and running engine demonstrations do show that S1r's video representations of an engine running on water are probably quite authentic. Capacitor70 has now upgraded and bench tested an improved circuit, which uses a second spark plug as a switch to slow down the HV pulse slightly while high voltage capacitors (in the 7500 picofarad range) briefly charge and then discharge across the switching plug's gap to activate the primary winding of a toroidal step-up transformer. This step-up transformer really is functional, and steps the voltage output of the secondary's magnet wire windings up to nearly 3 times the HV seen at the primary winding, which would result in a spark voltage of 100kv or more. The secondary winding is in a series circuit with the low voltage 50 amps applied across the engine's spark plug. The isolating properties of the transformer effectively cancel the need for the multiple diodes used in Capacitor70's previous circuitry. Another thing this transformer accomplishes is to lengthen the duration of the spark, and that will probably be of advantage in a water fuel circuit. Most small engines use CDI ignition nowadays, and CDI alone - without the transformer, would provide a very brief duration spark. That's great for a high revving small engine, or a racing engine in an automobile, but not for water fuel sparks. The voltage boost from Cap70's transformer will certainly produce a more powerful plasma arc than was possible in his working motorbike S1r replication. Capacitor 70 is rebuilding his motorbike engine, and will apply the new circuit to it when ready. His circuit bench tested quite well, and he appears to be very happy with it. I hope this post will serve to clear up the complexities and mysteries of the S1r water fueled engine videos, which I do believe to be authentic for the reasons stated herein. For future experimentation and applications of S1r technology, I suggest that you start with the improved design of Capacitor 70's latest circuit for best results. It is still the actual S1r method, as used in his videos, but simply made safer and better. See it at Capacitor70 latest circuit 7-17-08.jpg - Windows Live SkyDrive If you carefully listen to the words of Stan Mayer about water fuel injector.... http://www.overunity.com/index.php?a...=2399 8;image http://www.overunity.com/index.php?a...=2400 0;image Note that you can not make and distribute these items to others, as they do have full patent protection. Aside from initial experimentation to prove to yourself that the Kiker products really do enhance spark production and battery power transmission, your best option is to purchase the products in a configuration that is made by Harvey Kiker to assure yourself of the best possible results using his latest innovations and enhancements. Harvey is constantly seeking improvements to his already remarkable products, and is currently doing research on a device that he says appears to have "amazing" potential. See more about his available products at: Better Fuel Mileage

4 comments:

russ - said...

I have been tinkering with the S1r circuit for some time. The original 2008 18HP Briggs ran on water vapor pressure from amplified spark and modified timing. The extension cord may have been a tap to ground, so as electromagnet is always on, providing constant small magnetic effect at plug tip- not verified. 5-7 amps required to discharge with the regular magnetron high voltage at zero ohms spark plug. There is also waste spark firing, which may interfere -uneven running engine. On board charger can be modified to 15 amps. Direct connection mode method with high v to battery requires diode bank protection. Induction mode method requires less input amps,no diodes bank, but hand made isolation transformer ratios set up. Lawnmowers are negative high voltage out to positive ground. So the additional circuit has to be the same also. The modern type cap discharge method is too quick- doesn"t allow for spark time extension as the S1r method allows for. (More time for contact with water moisture.)

cars admire said...

hi russ i would like to work with you if you can !! I'm just a guy who loves to write about great automobiles and great automobile people. My mission is to bring more people to an awareness of the satisfaction and enjoyment that is to be found in the gathering of knowledge, and more importantly, the understanding, of the history of this wonderful machine. on Water Injection By Robert Mann

John Arne Løken said...

Thank you for creating this site.

cars admire said...

you welcome John Arne Løken